I’m ashamed to say that I’d never been to Spurn Point before. It’s always interested me, and I’m so pleased I went! The long spit of sand that stretches out into the sea has an odd character all of its own.

Silent, the industrial landscape of Hull sits on the horizon and large tankers pass behind the lighthouse on its point. The inland facing side is calm and warm in the spring sunlight, and the side to the North Sea is brown and churning, highlighted with orange and pink in the sun.

Sea birds flock on the sands, and the dunes are swathed in dancing dune grasses and stout black thorn bushes.

Soft and hard, harsh and kind.

……………

I found a spot in the dunes, with an inland-facing view of the lighthouse. The sand bank curved away, protecting it from the harshness on the other side. The shadows of the grasses played on my sketch book.

Shadows from the dune grasses dance on my sketchbook

Shadows from the dune grasses dance on my sketchbook

Watercolour and graphite

Watercolour and graphite

Spurn Point. Charcoal and chalk

Spurn Point. Charcoal and chalk

Spurn Point. Charcoal and chalk

Spurn Point. Charcoal and chalk

On the beach, I found a view of the wind turbines out at sea. Thick wooden posts jutted out of the sand into the sea. A seagull sat on one.

Spurn Point wind turbines. Charcoal and chalk

Spurn Point wind turbines. Charcoal and chalk

I will be working these up onto paintings, and intend to go back in the late spring to see how it has changed.